Category Archives: Announcements

My article “Of Heroes and Polemics” currently open-access via Anthrosource

My article in PoLAR, Of Heroes and Polemics: “The Policeman” in Urban Ethnography, has been recognized as one of the “most-discussed” in the Anthrosource catalog, and is currently open-access

 

See more via Open Access Articles from the American Anthropological Association.

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Thank You Congress for Increasing Funds for the Social Sciences

Welcome to the AAA Blog

Please write to your Senators and House Representatives to thank them for enacting a fiscal year (FY) 2014 appropriations bill that provides increased funding to federal science agencies important to social and behavioral science researchers.  In addition to protecting research budgets, the FY 2014 omnibus bill was free of troublesome policy riders that would have been harmful to the social science research enterprise. Through the Consortium of Social Science Association’s (COSSA) portal, you can find out how your representative voted and send a personalized thank you note.  Please take a moment to thank your elected officials for their efforts to come to final agreement on FY 2014 spending and preserve social science.

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New Syllabus: Ethnographies of Police

ImageI’ve just uploaded a copy of the syllabus for a new class I’ll be teaching the second half of this semester, “Ethnographies of Police”.  I’m pretty psyched about it.  You can find a pdf version here, or go to the “Teaching” page of my blog and see it amongst the other syllabi uploaded there.

[Extended Deadline] CFP: Bureaucracy as Practical Ethics: attending to moments of ethical problematization through ethnography

Panel to be submitted for the American Ethnological Society & Association for Political and Legal Anthropology Spring Meeting Chicago, Illinois April 11-13, 2013

A significant strain of scholarship on the anthropology of ethics suggests that, since the Enlightenment, ethical thought in the West has been reduced to sheer will to power. A key point of evidence for this claim has been the reliance on bureaucratic forms of administration, which are highlighted as examples of alienating “anti-politics” machines of indifference. This panel hopes to challenge that broad understanding of the role of ethical thought within the contemporary world by using sensitive ethnographic accounts of bureaucratic praxis to explore how ethical challenges are confronted across a variety of contexts. The goal is to use these accounts in order to open up a conversation in which anthropologists might more adequately attend to moments of ethical problematization; moments that offer concrete opportunity for ethical refiguration and, therefore, ethical thought within contemporary political forms.

If you are interested in participating in the panel, please email a proposed paper title and abstract of no more than 250 words to Dr. Kevin Karpiak (kkarpiak@emich.edu) by Tuesday, January 22nd.

[Update: Since the deadline to submit panel proposals has been moved back, I’ve decided to extend this as well: paper abstracts should now be submitted by Wednesday, February 13th.]

Conference: XIst Colloquium for Police History (University of Cologne, July 14th-17th, 2010) (via Anthropoliteia: the anthropology of policing)

Next week I’ll be heading off to Germany for a conference on Police History at the University of Cologne. You can read more about it over at Anthropoliteia…

Thought I’d circulate the info for a conference I’m very excited about attending next week, being sponsored by the University of Cologne, Germany.  You can check out the flyer as a pdf here, or you can see the full schedule below. I’d love to say a bit more about it now, but I’m furiously reworking my own talk after re-reading Security, Territory, Population.  I’ll try to report back on the conference later, though, as I’m sure it will be of curr … Read More

via Anthropoliteia: the anthropology of policing

Conference: XIst Colloquium for Police History (University of Cologne, July 14th-17th, 2010)

Next week I’ll be heading off to Germany for a conference on Police History at the University of Cologne.   You can read more about it over at Anthropoliteia, or through the clipped segment below

Continue reading Conference: XIst Colloquium for Police History (University of Cologne, July 14th-17th, 2010)

Ypsilanti, Here I Come!

I just thought I’d let readers of this blog know, and perhaps warn the denizens of the greater Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti-area, that I will officially be assuming a tenure-track position in the Fall as Assistant Professor of  Criminology in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology at Eastern Michigan University.

I’m excited by the opportunity to join such a thriving and dynamic department.  I’m especially looking forward to being in an interdisciplinary and theoretically rigorous research and teaching environment that should push my work in new directions and for which, hopefully, I’ll be able to contribute my own combination of interests and expertise.

In any case, I’m sure I’ll be blogging more about the move to a new city and institution… so stay tuned!

Cultural and Biological Contexts of Psychiatric Disorder: Implications for Diagnosis and Treatment – 2010 Conference

FPR-UCLA Fourth Interdisciplinary Conference

Cultural and Biological Contexts of Psychiatric Disorder

Implications for Diagnosis and Treatment

January 22-24, 2010

Friday – Sunday

University of California, Los Angeles

Our concept of mental illness in the West is largely shaped by the DSM diagnostic model. The DSM categorization of psychiatric disorders has been useful in driving research, and psychiatric neuroscience has made enormous strides in identifying some of the brain-based factors that contribute to mental disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder, as well as suggesting possible drug therapies. However, both neuroscientists and anthropologists have raised questions about the validity and utility of these categories. Neuroscientists are concerned that the categories obfuscate the key brain-behavior linkages underlying pathological processes. Anthropologists on the other hand argue that the categories are largely social constructions and that the current neurobiological zeitgeist minimally attends to social and cultural processes of mental illness. Much still remains unknown, particularly how the social and cultural worlds interact with neurobiological processes to produce mental symptoms that we recognize as depression or psychosis in everyday life and what this interaction implies for diagnosis and treatment.

The aim of this conference is to improve the quality of psychiatric diagnosis and treatment by giving specific attention to biological and cultural contexts and their interactions. Given the abundant criticism directed to both the biological and cultural validity of current DSM diagnostic categories, the focus is particularly important and timely. Revisions to the DSM are now underway that attempt to incorporate divergent cross-cultural aspects of mental illness, as well as underlying neurobiological factors common to different disorders. Both areas will be addressed at the conference in presentations and panel discussions.

via Cultural and Biological Contexts of Psychiatric Disorder: Implications for Diagnosis and Treatment – 2010 Conference.

New Course: Writing Police Power

On Monday I’ll start teaching my last course here at Berkeley.  It’s a reading and composition course–so its main goal is to teach first and second-year undergraduates the skills necessary for reading, writing and doing research at the college level–but within that overall goal individual instructors get a huge amount of leeway in picking the course theme.

My course will be “Writing Police Power” and I’m pretty excited by it.  You can see a copy of the syllabus here.  the basic premise of the course is that writing about police, across a variety of genres (including urban ethnography), is a way of writing about power.  This is also the thesis of an article I’ve written, currently under review by PoLAR, but the main point for the students here is to get how different representational strategies couch within theme theories of power–a skill they’ll need if they’re going to be critical readers of ethnographic texts for upper division courses.

Since this is a super-condensed summer course I decided to cut out more of the examples from critical theory (Althusser on interpollation, Lacan on the Purloined Letter, etc.) than I’d ideally like, but I do hope it goes well.  Any comments would be awesome, however…

Next Up: “Electric Burns” at University of Chicago

If anyone’s in the Chicagoland area next week, I’ll be presenting a draft of my upcoming article “Electric Burns: the banlieue riots and the problem of a post-social police in France”  (see details below) so that all the smart people over at the University of Chicago’s  Anthropology of Europe Workshop can comment on it and be otherwise helpful in its development.

Email me or Owen Kohl to get a draft of the article; it will be assumed you’ve read it beforehand.

Continue reading Next Up: “Electric Burns” at University of Chicago